Harry Fawcett Buckley's A short history of physics, PDF

By Harry Fawcett Buckley

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That is: “Information regarding the behaviour of an atomic object obtained under definite experimental conditions may [. ] be adequately characterized as complementary to any information about the same object obtained by some other experimental arrangement excluding the fulfilment of the first conditions” (PWNB, 2:26; cf. 54 With the series of terminological and conceptual changes outlined so far in mind, we can briefly summarize Bohr’s ‘middle’-period complementarity argument with regard to quantum theory as follows.

Be adequately characterized as complementary to any information about the same object obtained by some other experimental arrangement excluding the fulfilment of the first conditions” (PWNB, 2:26; cf. 54 With the series of terminological and conceptual changes outlined so far in mind, we can briefly summarize Bohr’s ‘middle’-period complementarity argument with regard to quantum theory as follows. As in the ‘early’ period, Bohr starts by pointing to “the peculiar feature of indivisibility, or ‘individuality,’” of quantum phenomena (PWNB, 2:34),55 which implies that any observation of atomic processes involves an “unavoidable interaction between the objects and the measuring instruments” (PWNB, 2:25; cf.

Specifically, he argues, “the contrast between the feeling of free will, which governs the psychic life, and the apparently uninterrupted causal chain of the accompanying physiological processes” may be regarded as a relation of complementarity. For, just as any attempt at “a detailed causal tracing of atomic processes [. ). Bohr does not, however, restrict causality to the physiological dimension. Rather, he claims more generally that “causality may be considered as a mode of perception by which we reduce our sense impressions to order,” while “the freedom of the will 29 This sentence was not included in Bohr’s original lecture, but added afterward for the version published in Nature (see NBCW, 6:112, 136).

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A short history of physics, by Harry Fawcett Buckley


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